Network
Launch Date
Consensus
Note
Sepolia
Oct 2021
PoW
Like-for-like representation of Ethereum
Görli
Jan 2019
PoA
Proof-of-Authority
Kiln
Mar 2022
PoS
Post-Merge (for ETH2), shadow fork of the mainnet
Kintsugi
Dec 2021
PoS
DEPRECATED, use Kiln; post-Merge (for ETH2)
Ropsten
Nov 2016
PoW
DEPRECATED, use Sepolia; the Merge to happen on Jun 8, 2022
Rinkeby
Apr 2017
PoA
DEPRECATED, use Görli and Görli Faucet
Kovan
Mar 2017
PoA
DEPRECATED, use Sepolia or Görli
List of active and deprecated Ethereum testnets, including Kintsugi.
Features
Optimistic rollup 
ZK-rollup 
Proof
Uses fraud proofs to prove transaction validity. 
Uses validity (zero-knowledge) proofs to prove transaction validity. 
Capital efficiency
Requires waiting through a 1-week delay (dispute period) before withdrawing funds. 
Users can withdraw funds immediately because validity proofs provide incontrovertible evidence of the authenticity of off-chain transactions. 
Data compression
Publishes full transaction data as calldata to Ethereum Mainnet, which increases rollup costs. 
Doesn't need to publish transaction data on Ethereum because ZK-SNARKs and ZK-STARKs already guarantee the accuracy of the rollup state. 
EVM compatibility
Uses a simulation of the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM), which allows it to run arbitrary logic and support smart contracts. 
Doesn't widely support EVM computation, although a few EVM-compatible ZK-rollups have appeared. 
Rollup costs
Reduces costs since it publishes minimal data on Ethereum and doesn't have to post proofs for transactions, except in special circumstances. 
Faces higher overhead from costs involved in generating and verifying proofs for every transaction block. ZK proofs require specialized, expensive hardware to create and have high on-chain verification costs. 
Trust assumptions
Doesn't require a trusted setup. 
Requires a trusted setup to work. 
Liveness requirements
Verifiers are needed to keep tabs on the actual rollup state and the one referenced in the state root to detect fraud. 
Users don't need someone to watch the L2 chain to detect fraud. 
Security properties 
Relies on cryptoeconomic incentives to assure users of rollup security. 
Relies on cryptographic guarantees for security. 
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Testnets
KINTSUGI VS. KILN TESTNET

Kintsugi vs. Kiln testnet

What are Kiln and Kintsugi, Comparisons, and How to Use
Last Updated:
June 9, 2022

As the Ethereum blockchain matures, more test networks have emerged to help core developers and Ethereum dApp developers prepare for Ethereum’s upcoming merge to proof of stake. 

Two of the testnets, Kintsugi and Kiln, focus on preparing for the upcoming launch of Ethereum’s new consensus layer upgrade. 

This article will compare the  Kiln and Kintsugi testnets and show how to use them.

What are the similarities between the Kiln testnet and the Kintsugi testnet?

The biggest similarity between Kiln and Kintsugi is their consensus mechanism: proof-of-stake (PoS) instead of proof-of-work (PoW). Having undergone the long-anticipated Merge, both Kiln and Kintsugi use the eco-friendly consensus layer with cheaper gas. The client developer intends this transition from PoW to PoS to uncover any major issues before the completion of the Merge later this year.   

The Kintsugi test blockchain was launched by the Ethereum Foundation as an Ethereum community initiative in December 2021. Kintsugi was the first “longer-lived public testnet” intended for initial merge testing. Similarly, the Kiln testnet was launched by Ethereum in March 2022 as the second testnet to experiment with the post-merge environment.

Both merge testnets are shadow forks of the Ethereum chain. Thus, they are identical to the Ethereum chains and thus are completely EVM-compatible.

As the testnets simulate post-merge environments, they use Beacon nodes and Execution engines in their consensus clients, handled by the existing execution layer client (pre-merge). 

While both layers maintain independent API endpoints, they are intertwined with peer-to-peer connections to bridge the Eth1 clients with the PoS mechanism of Beacon chains. 

More information about Ethereum’s post-merge architecture can be found in Tim Beiko’s AllCoreDevs update 007 on Mirror.

An image showing how beacon nodes and execution engines interact in a post-merge Ethereum client as found in Kiln and Kintsugi testnets.
Source

What are the differences between the Kiln testnet and the Kintsugi testnets?

The main difference between the Kiln and Kintsugi testnets is one is still active and the other is deprecated. In its early months, the Kintsugi testnet experienced major client bugs that resulted in the network forking twice. Soon after, the Kiln testing network was launched with improvements to re-test the post-merge environment. After the launch of the Kiln testnet, the Kintsugi network was officially deprecated.

Should I use the Kiln testnet or the Kintsugi testnet?

Since the Kintsugi testnet is officially deprecated after the unexpected forks, we recommend developers use the Kiln testnet and get Kiln ETH tokens from a Kiln faucet.

The Kiln testnet provides the community (e.g. node operators, developers, stakers, etc.) with an opportunity to experiment on a post-merge Ethereum blockchain. Developers are highly encouraged to test out applications on the Kiln testnet and report issues or feedback to help the core Ethereum developers complete a smooth transition to proof-of-stake.

However, with the Ropsten testnet merge to proof-of-stake, Tim Beiko, stated that the Kiln testnet will be shut down soon after merge. After the mainnet merge, the only two testnets that will be maintained are Goerli and Sepolia.

To start testing applications on Goerli, get Goerli ETH tokens from Alchemy’s Goerli faucet.

KINTSUGI VS. KILN TESTNET

Kintsugi vs. Kiln testnet

What are Kiln and Kintsugi, Comparisons, and How to Use

As the Ethereum blockchain matures, more test networks have emerged to help core developers and Ethereum dApp developers prepare for Ethereum’s upcoming merge to proof of stake. 

Two of the testnets, Kintsugi and Kiln, focus on preparing for the upcoming launch of Ethereum’s new consensus layer upgrade. 

This article will compare the  Kiln and Kintsugi testnets and show how to use them.

What are the similarities between the Kiln testnet and the Kintsugi testnet?

The biggest similarity between Kiln and Kintsugi is their consensus mechanism: proof-of-stake (PoS) instead of proof-of-work (PoW). Having undergone the long-anticipated Merge, both Kiln and Kintsugi use the eco-friendly consensus layer with cheaper gas. The client developer intends this transition from PoW to PoS to uncover any major issues before the completion of the Merge later this year.   

The Kintsugi test blockchain was launched by the Ethereum Foundation as an Ethereum community initiative in December 2021. Kintsugi was the first “longer-lived public testnet” intended for initial merge testing. Similarly, the Kiln testnet was launched by Ethereum in March 2022 as the second testnet to experiment with the post-merge environment.

Both merge testnets are shadow forks of the Ethereum chain. Thus, they are identical to the Ethereum chains and thus are completely EVM-compatible.

As the testnets simulate post-merge environments, they use Beacon nodes and Execution engines in their consensus clients, handled by the existing execution layer client (pre-merge). 

While both layers maintain independent API endpoints, they are intertwined with peer-to-peer connections to bridge the Eth1 clients with the PoS mechanism of Beacon chains. 

More information about Ethereum’s post-merge architecture can be found in Tim Beiko’s AllCoreDevs update 007 on Mirror.

An image showing how beacon nodes and execution engines interact in a post-merge Ethereum client as found in Kiln and Kintsugi testnets.
Source

What are the differences between the Kiln testnet and the Kintsugi testnets?

The main difference between the Kiln and Kintsugi testnets is one is still active and the other is deprecated. In its early months, the Kintsugi testnet experienced major client bugs that resulted in the network forking twice. Soon after, the Kiln testing network was launched with improvements to re-test the post-merge environment. After the launch of the Kiln testnet, the Kintsugi network was officially deprecated.

Should I use the Kiln testnet or the Kintsugi testnet?

Since the Kintsugi testnet is officially deprecated after the unexpected forks, we recommend developers use the Kiln testnet and get Kiln ETH tokens from a Kiln faucet.

The Kiln testnet provides the community (e.g. node operators, developers, stakers, etc.) with an opportunity to experiment on a post-merge Ethereum blockchain. Developers are highly encouraged to test out applications on the Kiln testnet and report issues or feedback to help the core Ethereum developers complete a smooth transition to proof-of-stake.

However, with the Ropsten testnet merge to proof-of-stake, Tim Beiko, stated that the Kiln testnet will be shut down soon after merge. After the mainnet merge, the only two testnets that will be maintained are Goerli and Sepolia.

To start testing applications on Goerli, get Goerli ETH tokens from Alchemy’s Goerli faucet.

ALCHEMY SUPERNODE - ETHEREUM NODE API

Scale to any size, without any errors

Alchemy Supernode finally makes it possible to scale blockchain applications without all the headaches. Plus, our legendary support will guide you every step of the way.

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ALCHEMY SUPERNODE - ETHEREUM NODE API

Scale to any size, without any errors

Alchemy Supernode finally makes it possible to scale blockchain applications without all the headaches. Plus, our legendary support will guide you every step of the way.

Get started for free
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